Biome reconstruction on the Tibetan Plateau since the Last Glacial Maximum using a machine learning method

This dataset is the biome change data of the Tibetan Plateau since the last glacial maximum which was reconstructed by using a new method. Firstly, a random forest algorithm was applied to establish a pollen-biome classification model for reconstructing past vegetation changes of the Tibetan Plateau, and 1802 modern pollen assemblages from 17 vegetation zones in and around the Tibetan Plateau were used as the training set for the model development. The random forest model showed a reliable performance (accuracy > 76%) in predicting modern biomes from modern pollen assemblages based on a comparison with the observed biomes. Moreover, the random forest model had a significantly higher accuracy than the traditional biomization method. Then, the newly established random forest model is applied to the paleovegetation reconstruction of 51 fossil pollen sequences of the Tibetan Plateau. New age-depth models were developed for these fossil pollen records using the Bayesian method, and all fossil pollen records were linearly interpolated to 500-year time slices. Finally, the spatiotemporal changes of biomes on the Tibetan plateau over the past 22,000 years at an interval of 500 years were reconstructed by using the random forest model. This dataset can provide evidence for understanding the past variation of alpine vegetation and its mechanism; provide the basis for studying the impact of past climate change on vegetation on the Tibetan Plateau; and provide boundary conditions for climate simulation.

0 2022-02-14

Tibetan Plateau: An evolutionary junction for the history of modern biodiversity.

Holding particular biological resources, the Tibetan Plateau is a unique geologic-geographic-biotic interactively unite and hence play an important role in the global biodiversity domain. The Tibetan Plateau has undergone vigorous environmental changes since the Cenozoic, and played roles switching from “a paradise of tropical animals and plants” to “the cradle of Ice Age mammalian fauna”. Recent significant paleontological discoveries have refined a big picture of the evolutionary history of biodiversity on that plateau against the backdrop of major environmental changes, and paved the way for the assessment of its far-reaching impact upon the biota around the plateau and even in more remote regions. Here, based on the newly reported fossils from the Tibetan Plateau which include diverse animals and plants, we present a general review of the changing biodiversity on the Tibetan Plateau and its influence in a global scale. We define the Tibetan Plateau as a junction station of the history of modern biodiversity, whose performance can be categorized in the following three patterns: (1) Local origination of endemism; (2) Local origination and “Out of Tibet”; (3) Intercontinental dispersal via Tibet. The first pattern is exemplified by the snow carps, the major component of the freshwater fish fauna on the plateau, whose temporal distribution pattern of the fossil schizothoracines approximately mirrors the spatial distribution pattern of their living counterparts. Through ascent with modification, their history reflects the biological responses to the stepwise uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. The second pattern is represented by the dispersal history of some mammals since the Pliocene and some plants. The ancestors of some Ice Age mammals, e.g., the wholly rhino, Arctic fox, and argali sheep first originated and evolved in the uplifted and frozen Tibet during the liocene, and then migrated toward the Arctic regions or even the North American continent at beginning of the Ice Age; the ancestor of pantherines (big cats) first rose in Tibetan Plateau during the Pliocene, followed by the disperse of its descendants to other parts of Asia, Africa, North and South America to play as top predators of the local ecosystems. The early members of some plants, e.g., Elaeagnaceae appeared in Tibet during the Late Eocene and then dispersed and were widely distributed to other regions. The last pattern is typified by the history of the tree of heaven (Ailanthus) and climbing perch. Ailanthus originated in the Indian subcontinent, then colonized into Tibet after the Indian-Asian plate collision, and dispersed therefrom to East Asia, Europe and even North America. The climbing perches among freshwater fishes probably rose in Southeast Asia during the Middle Eocene, dispersed to Tibet and then migrated into Africa via the docked India. These cases highlight the role of Tibet, which was involved in the continental collision, in the ntercontinental biotic interchanges. The three evolutionary patterns

0 2022-02-14